Librarians—Authors’ Best Friends

Often writers are curious to learn which marketing and publicity ideas work for other writers and which do not. I, too, am curious about the very same thing. We blog and interview on various blog-sites; we e-mail newsletters to established fans and snail-mail publicity postcards to announce upcoming books; we FaceBook and Twitter and network and wonder if it does any good at all. Author talks at local libraries were something I tried after my first release of Amish fiction. For the first time, I felt connected to readers, up-close and personal. I listened to feedback, answered questions about upcoming books in the series, and shared what I’d learned along the road to publication. Wait a minute, you might be thinking. We want to interact with people who go out and buy our books. I’m here to say libraries buy books too—plenty of them. Many readers who find your work in the stacks—or even on the twenty-five-cent clearance table—will buy in the future if they like your style. Readers need to watch their finances, same as other consumers. But I have made fans-for-life who originally found me at the library and now purchase my books for their collections. Plus librarians are some of the nicest people on earth. They love to read and love authors who take time to visit their community rooms, usually allowing you to sell and sign books afterward.

Since I write about the Amish, I often speak on steps to simplify lives, or ways my life has been changed from interviewing these God-fearing, passionate Christians. Readers also want to hear how we get story ideas and how we research our topics. Most often I’m asked to speak about my personal path of publication. Fledgling and would-be writers tend to haunt libraries and will appreciate any advice you can give them. After answering questions, I take time to plug ACFW and what our wonderful organization can do to further their careers. Over the years, I’ve discovered libraries aren’t just great places to read, research, and hide from the world. The librarians who work inside can often be a writer’s best friend.

My first inspirational romance, A Widow’s Hope, was a 2010 Carol Award finalist and received the Holt Medallion Award of Merit. My current release is Living in Harmony, first in the New Beginnings series. Please sign up for my newsletter at www.maryellis.net

About Living in Harmony

 

A Tragedy…a Refusal…a Shunning

Will Their Young Love Survive?

 Amy King—young, engaged, and Amish—faces life-altering challenges when she suddenly loses both of her parents in a house fire. Her fiancé, John Detweiler, persuades her to leave Lancaster County and make a new beginning with him in Harmony, Maine, where he has relatives who can help them.

 John’s brother Thomas and sister-in-law, Sally, readily open their home to the newcomers. Wise beyond his years, Thomas, a minister in the district, refuses to marry Amy and John upon their arrival, suggesting instead a period of adjustment. While trying to assimilate in the ultraconservative district, Amy discovers an aunt who was shunned. Amy wants to reconnect with her, but John worries that the woman’s tarnished reputation will reflect badly on his beloved bride-to-be.

Can John and Amy find a way to overcome problems in their relationship and live happily in Harmony before making a lifetime commitment to each other?

About Mary Ellis

Mary Ellis grew up near the Amish and fell in love with them. She has now written nine bestselling novels set in their communities. When not writing, she enjoys gardening, bicycling, and swimming. Before “retiring” to write full-time, Mary taught school and worked as a sales rep for Hershey Chocolate. Her debut Christian book, A Widow’s Hope, was a finalist for the 2010 ACFW Carols.

http://www.maryellis.net

https://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/Mary-Ellis/126995058236

 

 

 

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